Fruit Types

Fruits We Grow at Hilltop Community Farm

We sell our fruit by the pint or pound to those who like fruit fresh or for preserving. We also sell fruit wholesale to restaurants.

If you'd like to order a pint or several pounds of fruit, please contact us and we will add you to our fruit list. We will let you know availability and pricing and sign up as fruit becomes available. Pick-up/delivery is at the farm or at our CSA drop-site in Madison.

 currant fruit

currant fruit

 currant flower

currant flower

Currants

While some enjoy eating currants fresh, these fruit are especially prized for use in making jellies, jams, pies, and sauces. For fresh eating let the berries hang for about three weeks after they color up. To avoid
damaging the fruits, pick a whole strig by its stem, taking care not to damage the spur. Currants enjoy a cosmopolitan culinary status revered by many global kitchens. Currants have been used for wine, said by some to be similar in flavor to Graves or Rhine wines. Black currants have a nutty, clove-like taste and are the traditional source of the French liqueur, Cassis. Currants also work well, infused with vodka or fermented for cordial. In France, the rarefied, Bar-le-duc or Lorraine jelly is traditionally made from white
currants. In Scandinavia, currants are used in fruit soups and summer puddings, and used in combination with custard or meringue. In Germany, the syrup derived from red currant is added to soda water for a refreshing drink.

Interested in learning more?


 elderberry fruit

elderberry fruit

 elderberry flower

elderberry flower

Elderberry

Elderberry also enjoys much appeal as an edible fruit crop and exhibits much potential for value-added products. The fruit can be eaten fresh, though it does harbor a slight astringent taste and eating one too many under ripe berries can be toxic. Fresh and dried berries can be found in breakfast cereals, yogurts and cream. Many prefer the distinct flavor of elderberries in pies, syrups, jams, juices, salad dressings, wine, port, cordials, beer and liquors.

Interested in learning more?


 hardy kiwi fruit

hardy kiwi fruit

 hardy kiwi flower

hardy kiwi flower

Hardy Kiwi

Yes you can grow kiwi in Wisconsin!
Hardy Kiwi are the Siberian relative of the familiar, fuzzy variety.  They can be eaten whole, like berries.  Hardy Kiwi ripen beginning early September and are best enjoyed when the skin turns from light green to dark green and they become quite soft, sometimes even a bit wrinkly.  The taste is similar to the large kiwi, and the consistency is juicy and almost pudding-like when fully ripe. Blemishes on the skin are common and indicate no bruising or pest damage. Kiwi should be left at room temperature to ripen; stored in plastic in the fridge, their ripening can be delayed many days. We are convinced that hardy kiwi will be your new late summer fruit love.

Interested in learning more?

  • Fruit Card


 honeyberry fruit

honeyberry fruit

Plums

Plums (and apricots) typically are our 'learning' trees, as it turns out, could be few and far between or so prolific we thought the branches would snap under their weight. We have found that Mt. Royal is self-fertile consistent producer, with other prunus friends a bit more fickle to Wisconsin's climes. Plums are members of the same family as apricots and cherries but have a slightly mistier history.  They are slow to ripe (they start to tempt us in July, but don't turn until August - early September), but first to bloom in the spring, their petals waking up the forest edges and orchards alike.

Interested in learning more?


 quince fruit

quince fruit

 quince flower

quince flower

Quince

I think everyone has a certain favorite tree. Growing up, I loved catalpa trees for their blossoms signaled that school would soon be out for the summer. I still love catalpas, though I have recently fallen in love with the 'love apple' (aka Quince). The pear shaped golden fruit of quince are the last to ripen at the farm. This could be due in part to the delicate pink blossoms making a late showcase in the orchard, thus avoid spring freezes. We've found a good variety in Cydonia oblonga - aromatnaya, adapted to a variety of soils and temperatures with good pest and disease resistance. Quince are traditionally used in baking, though can be eaten fresh if left to slowly ripen on your counter. High in vitamin C and B2, and lauded as the 'stomach's comforter, Apicius, author of the world's first cookbook, recommended whole quinces boiled with honey and wine. Enjoy this divine golden fruit from the farm in late October.

Interested in learning more?


 saskatoon fruit

saskatoon fruit

 saskatoon flower

saskatoon flower

Saskatoon

Strong fresh market appeal for U-pick operations as well as high demand for processing due to its versatility of products such as preserves, pies, sauces, soups, stews, wines, or dried with meats. The fact that dried saskatoons were used historically as an important article of trade showcases the unusually high regard Native Americans displayed toward these fruits. Like the cranberry, saskatoons were used in a wide variety of soups, stews, and sauces as well as dried with venison.

The pioneers of the Great Plains chose the blossoms of the ‘serviceberry’ to decorate their services and graves, as the beautiful blooms coincided with spring thaw, meaning those who had died over the winter could finally be buried.

Interested in learning more?


More Fruit We Grow at the Farm


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